A word of protest (1972)

LaBrant, L. (1972, December). A word of protest. Teachers College Record, 74(2), 167-169.

LaBrant confronts contemporary educational change in the context of approaches practiced (and then ignored) from the 1920s and 1930s.

Quoting LaBrant:

Like many of today’s reformers and critics, the earlier leaders saw great concern with freedom of both thought and behavior. Educators questioned the lockstep teaching of conventional subject matter, limitations of the material, and formality instead of natural teacher-pupil relations. (p. 169)

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Broadening the experiences of deprived readers (1965)

LaBrant, L. (1965, April). Broadening the experiences of deprived readers. Education, 499–502.

LaBrant discusses struggling reader, drawing on her experience with junior high students on the Lower East Side in New York City.

Quoting LaBrant:

We frequently overlook the need of the bilingual child or youth to take advantage of a language which is an intimate part of his childhood. … One might note the pleasure young Negro readers often find in some of the pictures of Negro life by Ralph Ellison or James Baldwin, a please of recognition and not of protest. (p. 501)

…A diversified, individualized offering permits the “deprived” reader to utilize the large experience he has acquired in out-of-school hours. We tend to measure the experience of such young people in terms of what they lack; that is, in terms of what they do not know but which other middle-class young people do know. (p. 502)

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